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Tibetan Buddhist Mandala and Tea Offering at AcuMedic Centre

We are deeply honoured to announce that from the 27th to the 29th of October we will be blessed with the presence of six Tibetan Buddhist Monks from the Gaden Ngari Khangtsen Monastery.

These monks, exiled from Tibet and practising in South India, have graciously offered to spend three days with us to create a sand mandala and present a tea offering in our teahouse.

This event is free for everyoneand will give you a unique opportunity to witness traditional Himalayan monastic temple artistry and practice. It is truly a special experience and is open to everyone from all ages, religions and beliefs.

We do hope that you will come and join us to sit and drink tea while absorbing this meaningful experience. We would like to offer my deepest gratitude to the Gaden Ngari Khangsten monks for honouring us.

Programme of Events (subject to change):

Friday 27th October

10am - Opening Ceremony with multiphonic chanting

11am - 5pm - Creating the Mandala

Saturday 28th October

10am - 5pm Continuing the Mandala

3pm - Tea Offering Ceremony

Sunday 29th October

11am - 3pm Finishing the Mandala

3pm - Closing Ceremony and procession up to Camden Canal to distribute the sand of the Mandala

THE MEDICINE MANDALA

The mandala which the Monks will create from coloured sand will be an intricate 'Medicine Buddha Mandala' to infuse our clinic with healing intention.

From all the artistic traditions of Tantric Buddhism, that of painting with coloured sand ranks as one of the most unique and exquisite. Millions of grains of sand are painstakingly laid into place, formed of a traditional prescribed iconography that includes geometric shapes and ancient spiritual symbols.

Traditionally most sand mandalas are deconstructed shortly after their completion. This is done as a metaphor of the impermanence of life. The sands are swept up and placed in an urn; to fulfill the function of healing, half is distributed to the audience at the closing ceremony, while the remainder is carried to a nearby body of water, where it is deposited. The waters then carry the healing blessing to the ocean, and from there it spreads throughout the world for planetary healing.

Download the PDF Event Flyer

ABOUT THE GADEN NGARI KHANGSTEN MONKS

The monks are on tour in the UK to raise awareness of ancient Tibetan culture and traditions and engage with communities around the globe to promote world peace.

The Gaden Shartse Monastery was established over a hundred years ago in the Tibetan Himalayas. After the Tibetan uprising in 1959, seven monks from the monastery sought exile in India.

In 1967 the exiled Tibetan monks moved en masse to Southern India where they struggled to re-establish their monastery. In 1980 they managed to open a hostel to house the Monks and students. With the hostel, came young students. Mostly orphans or from poor families or sent by parents who wished their children to learn their traditional culture. Present day, Ngari Khangtsen has a total of about 200 students of all ages, workers, teachers and administrators.

The hostel has not been developed to handle this number of people and students have to share floor space with up to eight sleeping in each room or live in makeshift shelters. All funds raised during this tour will be used to build hostels for orphaned and disadvantaged children that the Monastery take care of and to help with a project to build a library and school.

Any donations to this cause will be gratefully received and there will be a collection box if you feel the urge to contribute to these plans. To find out more visit www.gadenngari.org

 

Last Updated: October 10, 2017

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